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DEC
16

RESEARCH
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Making the case for afterschool using America After 3PM

By Nikki Yamashiro

To make a convincing argument, you need two essential components.  The first is a compelling story.  In the afterschool field, there is no shortage of compelling stories about the power of afterschool programs and their ability to keep kids safe, inspire learning and support working parents.  The second are data to support and substantiate your point.  This is where America After 3PM—our recently released national household survey on afterschool program participation and demand for afterschool programs—comes in.   

Last week, we hosted a webinar that focused on the variety of ways afterschool program providers, parents, students and advocates can use the recently released America After 3PM data to make the case for afterschool.  If you missed the webinar, you can still watch the recording or take a look at the PowerPoint presentation

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learn more about: Advocacy America After 3PM Media Outreach State Policy
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DEC
10

NEWS ROUNDUP
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Weekly Media Roundup  December 10, 2014

By Luci Manning

Discovery Space Program Aims to Extend Science Education Past School Bell (Centre Daily Times, Pennsylvania)

An afterschool science program through Benner Elementary School and Discovery Space of Central Pennsylvania is encouraging students to think like engineers. During one week, the students, split into groups by grade, were encouraged to build structure-like objects from an assortment of tools, including wooden objects, rubber bands, magnetic links and cards. “Our mission is to teach them that being an engineer is not just driving a train,” Discover Science executive director Allayn Beck told Centre Daily Times. “We teach them all the different ways of engineering, and encourage them to think critically if something doesn’t work out.” Organizers say they hope the program will return next semester to continue to interest students in science after the bell rings.

Stevens Elementary Teacher Gives STEM Subjects a Musical Remix (The Spokesman-Review, Washington)

Teacher Shawn Tolley is combining his two passions—music and computer science—to show fifth- and sixth-graders in his before- and afterschool program how to mix and master music, record audio tracks, synthesize sounds and create electronic music. His students dream of becoming disc jockeys, video game designers, sound technicians or audio engineers, and just a couple months into the program, they’re already learning how to record music, move around audio tracks and manipulate sound. “I’ve been interested in how music can work in electronics,” 10-year-old Faith White told the Spokesman-Review. “I want to make music for a video game when I get older, and it shows me how to do that stuff.”

Letter to the Editor: A Great Program (Hudson Register-Star, New York)

Germantown High School senior Joshua Wyant wrote a letter to the editor for the Hudson Register-Star about his experiences with the Germantown After School Program (GAP).  He writes: “One of the best things ever to happen at Germantown Central School was the implementation of the Germantown After School Program…Besides providing time for homework, GAP also provides kids with many things to do so it will never get boring…This program offers activities where the kids can learn something. These activities include things such as violin lessons, jazz lessons, computer classes, and crafts…GAP also offers the kids a structured, safe environment…Since this program is so great, other school districts should offer it at an affordable rate.” 

Pirate Underground a Space for Marshfield’s Creative Crowd (Coos Bay The World, Oregon)

After noticing several students on the outskirts of Marshfield High School’s social scene, librarian Peggy Christensen launched a new afterschool library program called The Pirate Underground. “I just wanted kids who did not feel like they had a place to belong or a club to join, that they were welcomed in the afterschool library program,” Christensen told Coos Bay World. So far the group has focused on creative writing, art and music. Community artists come in to mentor the students and lead art projects, and students are encouraged to explore their creativity through various exercises. “It’s a nice break from doing school work,” student Jessica Baimbridge said. “You’re sitting in a classroom for 45 to 50 minutes straight and here you get to do what you actually like.”

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DEC
4

NEWS ROUNDUP
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Weekly Media Roundup  December 4, 2014

By Luci Manning

New Afterschool Program Is Creating Future Entrepreneurs (The Avenue News, Maryland)

Fourth through twelfth-grade students are developing business models and becoming future leaders through I AM O’Kah!’s entrepreneurship program. The 10-week course provides students with entrepreneurship training and communication and each week guest speakers talk to students about their own journey and overcoming obstacles. Aisha DaCosta, CEO of I AM O’Kah!, told The Avenue News that by the end of the program, each student will create a viable business idea to present to a panel of local entrepreneurs. The top three winners will be awarded a micro-grant to help start their business and will be assigned a local entrepreneur as a mentor for the first 30 days of their business venture.

Centre Mentors Coeds Spark Boyle Middle School Girls' Interest in Math, Science (The Advocate-Messenger, Kentucky)

Centre College sophomore Ceci Vollbrecht and several of her classmates formed GEMS (Girls in Engineering, Math and Science), an afterschool program at Boyle County Middle School, in an effort to grow the scientific interest in the next generation of girls. The mentoring program is funded by a grant from the National Girls Collaborative Project, which allows for the group to go on field trips to expose the students to the world of science. “Our goal is to keep them interested, do fun stuff with science, keep them active in it, provide role models for the ones who are pursuing higher level science – and college in general,” Vollbrecht told The Advocate-Messenger.

Digital Harbor Foundation Is Using 3-D Printing to Attract More Girls to Technology (Baltimore Business Journal, Maryland)

Even though the technology field is known for being male-dominated, girls dominate the Digital Harbor Foundation's 3-D printing competition every year. In order to develop even stronger interest among girls, the Baltimore technology education organization is launching a club called the Makerettes, which allows middle school and high school girls to work together on projects (3-D printed or otherwise) and get to know each other. Greer Melon, the foundation’s director of business operations told Baltimore Business Journal, “The culture of tech jobs is something that can be really off-putting for girls.” Organizers hope the club will not only attract new students, but also help female students overcome the male-dominated technology culture.

School Spotlight: Whitehorse Makers Club Spurs Creativity (Wisconsin State Journal, Wisconsin)

Recently at the Whitehorse Makers Club, 11 year-old Kodie Kramer created a game app featuring a roving tank that can now be found in the iTunes store. The club allows children to explore their creativity through inventions like Kodie’s and other projects like stop-motion animation, Post-it note murals, video games, music and avatars. Jennifer Milne-Carroll, library media technology specialist and creator of the Whitehorse Makers Club, told the Wisconsin State Journal that the club can help students explore different careers. Whitehorse art teacher Andrew Erickson said it helps them learn to work together and the students have a great deal of freedom. “It’s a place for them to make things, use their creativity. It’s a way to challenge themselves,” he said. “It’s fun to watch them explore and figure out what they want to do and how to accomplish it.”

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NOV
12

IN THE FIELD
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Weekly Media Roundup  November 12, 2014

By Luci Manning

MentorPlace Program Truly a Worthy Investment (Cincinnati Enquirer, Ohio)

Through the MentorPlace Program, Deer Park (OH) students are gaining the confidence to believe they can accomplish great things.  The afterschool program, a collaboration of IBM, the University of Cincinnati, The Greater Cincinnati STEM Collaborative and Deer Park City Community Schools, pairs IBM employees with middle school students to promote science and technology careers and work through personal issues.  Jeff Langdon, superintendent of Deer Park Community City Schools, told Cincinnati Enquirer, “The closing ceremony was so rewarding when we witnessed the confidence and pride the mentors evoked from our students.  The real-world connection was powerful in linking our students’ learning to their plans for the future.”

12 Computers Donated to Utica's Underground Café (Utica Observer-Dispatch, New York)

In poorer neighborhoods, it’s not uncommon for school to be the only place where youth have access to 21st century technology, and UnitedHealthcare is trying to help.  The group is donating 12 computers to Utica Safe Schools to establish a computer lab at its Underground Café teen center.  The Underground Café, open only to Thomas R. Proctor High School students, also offers an afterschool program, a drop-in center during school breaks and summer for recreational activities, opportunities for college preparation through increasing leadership and resiliency skills, and service learning projects.  Officials told the Utica Observer-Dispatch that the program “helps transform the experiences and perceptions of teens in Utica by creating venues for leadership, civic engagement and create expression.”

Nonprofit to Lock Up Business Leaders for a Good Cause (Brunswick News, Georgia)

Some local Georgia business owners might see the back of the police car this week, but it’s all for a good cause.  The Nonprofit C.I.A. (Children In Action) will be locking up business leaders, nominated by their employees, for their “Most Wanted” fundraising campaign.  Those nominated will be escorted by a Glynn County police officer and a child from the afterschool program back to the “jail” at C.I.A. headquarters, where they will be photographed, booked and held until they can post a $500 bail. All bail money will go directly to the Christian nonprofit’s operations fund for the year.  C.I.A. founder and director Allen Benner told Brunswick News that while in “jail,” he plans to speak to business leaders about his vision for C.I.A.’s future and discuss possible collaborations. Benner said he hopes allowing children to accompany officers on the round-up will help them build trust.

A Different Process': Artfigures Studio Provides Foundation, Inspires Creativity in Sculpture (The Citizen, New York)

Janie Darovskikh’s Art After School program held an unusual pumpkin-carving event on Oct. 30. Rather than simply scooping out the inside and cutting out a face on the front, the students researched their designs for the pumpkins and used the sculpting skills they learned in Darovskikh’s afterschool classes to make creative, colorful masterpieces, even using toothpicks to reattach pumpkin chunks as ears and other appendages.  Darovskikh explained to The Citizen that she teaches art based on her life philosophy: give students some initial lessons to provide them with a solid foundation, and then free them to explore their own creativity and figure out their own style through trial and error. While some students stick to one idea throughout an assignment, other students run through a few different ideas before completing their finished project. “Everyone has a different process,” Darovskikh said. “They don't always turn out how you envision them all the time.” For example, she described an assignment in which one student created an alien mask, another built a unicorn head, and a third designed a cartoon-looking bumblebee. In Darovskikh’s class, children are given the freedom to create whatever they can imagine. 

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learn more about: Digital Learning Marketing Media Outreach Community Partners
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NOV
4

LIGHTS ON
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Vote for your favorite afterschool photo

By Sarah Simpson

The photos are in, and it’s time to cast your vote!

Throughout the month of October, almost 300 photos were entered into the Lights On Afterschool photo contest and we’re letting Facebook users decide which programs will shine the brightest. Up to three programs are eligible to win $1000 in cash, and one program in a Bright House Networks service area can win up to $2000.

To help your favorite program win, all you have to do is vote for their photo on Facebook. You can only vote for a single photo once per day, but come back the following day to vote again! Now until Nov. 17, each Facebook user can cast up to 14 votes per photo by voting every day. Make sure to encourage parents, program staff, community members and friends to help your program win by voting often. Click here to vote now!

For more information check out the Lights On Afterschool contest page or see the official rules for details.

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learn more about: Funding Opportunity Media Outreach
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NOV
3

LIGHTS ON
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Elected officials show their support at Lights On Afterschool events nationwide

By Erik Peterson

Lights On Afterschool season is coming to an end, but we have one more great recap that we wanted to share. In addition to the 49 governors that recognized Lights On Afterschool, a number of elected officials—from school board members, to mayors, to state representatives, to governors and Members of Congress—attended Lights On Afterschool celebrations to show their support for the young people who make afterschool programs successful.

  • At the Alaska Afterschool Network’s first statewide Lights On Afterschool celebration, held at the Anchorage Museum, Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Rep. Don Young addressed more than 90 children from six different programs. The Congressman encouraged increased funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) initiative and voiced his strong support for the Summer Meals Act.  Sen. Murkowski, who has led the effort to strengthen 21st CCLC in the Senate through co-sponsorship of S. 326 with Sen. Boxer (D-Calif.), congratulated the young people, parents and program staff on the great progress that has been made in afterschool program in the state.
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learn more about: 21st CCLC Afterschool Voices Congress Events and Briefings Media Outreach State Policy Community Partners
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NOV
3

LIGHTS ON
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Last day to enter the Bright House Networks photo contest!

By Sarah Simpson

Don’t forget! Submit your best Lights On Afterschool photo by midnight tonight for the chance to win up to $2,000. 

Our partners at Bright House Networks want to see how your community celebrated Lights On Afterschool and the great ways that afterschool programs engage and inspire youth. Enter your photo with a creative caption on the Bright House Networks Facebook page by 11:59 PT tonight (Nov. 3) and starting tomorrow, have all of your supporters vote for their favorite.  The photos with the most votes will be eligible to win 1 of 3 $1,000 prizes, and the photo from the Bright House Networks market area that receives the most votes will be eligible to win $2,000! See official rules for details.

Take a look at last year’s submissions:

Ready. Set. SHINE!

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learn more about: Funding Opportunity Media Outreach
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NOV
3

POLICY
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Going to the polls for afterschool

By Sophie Papavizas

Don’t forget to get out and vote tomorrow!  No matter the results of the midterm elections, we can expect a number of new faces in public offices across the country, from local school boards to governor’s mansions to Congress.  We know from the recent America After 3PM data that an overwhelming majority of parents, 84 percent, support public funding for afterschool programs including 91 percent of Democratic parents and 80 percent of Republican parents. Education is among the portfolio of issues being mentioned by candidates.

This winter will be the perfect time to educate newly elected officials and their incoming staff on the importance of quality afterschool programs for all students.  You can even bring the new America After 3 PM data with you to let officials know the afterschool landscape in their state.  For more guidance on post-election follow up see the Afterschool Alliance’s toolbox on Making Afterschool an Election Issue.

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learn more about: Afterschool Voices Congress Education Reform Election Media Outreach
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