With billions in funding available for afterschool and summer enrichment, the American Rescue Plan presents a tremendous opportunity to support students’ recovery.

Reach out to local education leaders | See examples of partnerships between schools and programs

What funding is available?

Responsive image

The American Rescue Plan provides $500 billion that can be used in part to support young people during the hours they are out of school. Funds specifically available for afterschool and summer programs in the Plan include: 

  • $8.45B available from SEAs, including: 
    • $1.22B set-aside for summer enrichment
    • $1.22B set-aside for afterschool programs
    • 5%, approximately, $6.1B, for learning recovery, which can include afterschool/summer/ELT
  • $22B provided to LEAs for learning recovery strategies, including afterschool and summer enrichment
  • $39 billion for child care, which can include school-age care, which will flow to state child care agencies 
  • $1 billion for Corporation for National and Community Service through  AmeriCorps for AmeriCorps positions to help address learning recovery and other purposes
  • $350 billion for state and local governments that can be used in part for child care and other purposes

See the funds available in your state: FY2021 American Rescue Plan (ARP) ESSER Fund State Allocation Table.

^ Back to top

 

When is this funding available?

Enlarge this timeline.

ESSER Funding Timeline

^ Back to top

 

How can I access funding?

The federal government disbursed funds to states in March 2021. The federal Dept. of Education and Dept. of Health and Human Services provide direction to state education and human service agencies on how to distribute the funds. Here’s a quick take on how major categories of the funds will flow, and what you can do. 

  1. $21.9B for learning recovery to local education agencies/school districts. States will need to disperse funds to your local education agencies within 60 days. Each district will be required to use 20% of the new funds they receive on learning recovery strategies that may include afterschool/summer/ELT. Start mapping out what you can offer school districts, and prepare for your outreach to local education leaders. Use our toolkit for reaching out to local education leaders to access these resources. 
  2. $39 billion for child care has been sent to state child care agencies for dispersal – this includes school age care. State human service or child care agencies determine how the funds are dispersed. Reach out to state child care agencies to learn what their plans are for these funds. A portion of funds will flow through Child Care Development Block Grants while a majority of funds in each state for child care will be dispersed as child care provider stabilization grants. (Learn more about school-age child care and Child Care Development Block Grants.)
  3. $8.45 billion in funding to state education agencies (SEAs), including $1B for afterschool, $1B for summer enrichment, and $6B for learning recovery that can include afterschool and summer. Each state will have their own dispersal process and it will be important to advocate for an efficient distribution of these funds. Reach out to your statewide afterschool network to find out what's happening in your state. There may be a grant competition for some of the funds, either run by the SEA or a third party, or some may opt to channel the funds through 21st CCLC grantees. SEAs must complete the ESSER III State Plan Template and submit it to the US Dept of Education by June 7, outlining plans for responding to students' academic, social, emotional, and mental health needs, including afterschool and summer programs. The plan will be posted for public viewing. See examples from states that have announced plans for spending ESSER III plans on afterschool and summer.
  4. Counties and state governments have received $350 billion to spend. Reach out to county government officials to ask if there are plans to spend their allotment of funds in part on afterschool, youth programs, summer learning, or child care. (This was a common practice with funding from the previous relief bill known as CARES Act last summer.)

For local afterschool and summer program providers, it is important to seek partnerships with school districts. Use this toolkit to reach out to local education leaders — school boards, superintendents, and principals — to share what your program can offer students to support students’ academic, social, and emotional well-being.

^ Back to top

 

Evidence-based strategies & examples of programs supporting students’ recovery

 ^ Back to top