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Afterschool & STEM: System-Building Evaluation 2016

Year Published: 2017

A total of 1,599 students participating in afterschool programs with a STEM focus in grades 4-12 from 11 states completed retrospective self-report surveys measuring STEM-related attitudes and 21st century skills. Facilitators completed a survey about their experiences leading afterschool STEM, and the programs’ STEM activities were observed and evaluated to establish levels of quality. The evaluation found that students that participated in STEM-focused afterschool programs led to positive changes in students’ attitudes toward science, STEM interest, STEM identity, STEM career interest, career knowledge, 21st century skills, and critical thinking. Larger effects were seen in students who participated in programs for a minimum of four weeks. Higher quality STEM programs reported more positive gains than lower quality programs.

The Impact of Afterschool STEM: STEM 3D

Year Published: 2016

STEM 3D: Integrating Science Afterschool, a project of The Franklin Institute, engages underserved youth and families in year-round STEM learning and career awareness through a combination of afterschool, home and community activities. In this selection of evaluation data from the 2014-2015 school year, participants demonstrated gains along three major categories of youth outcomes—interest in STEM, capacity to engage in STEM, and finding value in STEM.

The Impact of Afterschool STEM: Science Club

Year Published: 2016

Science Club is a partnership between Northwestern University and the Boys & Girls Club of Chicago, utilizing long-term mentoring relationships to engage low-income urban youth in science. In this selection of evaluation data from the 2013-2014 school year, participants demonstrated gains along three major categories of youth outcomes—interest in STEM, capacity to engage in STEM, and finding value in STEM.

Baltimore Community Schools: Promise & Progress

Year Published: 2016

This evaluation found that during the 2014-15 school year, students participating in Baltimore Community Schools’ out-of-school time programs saw improvements in their school day attendance and a significant decrease in being chronically absent from school. However, no effect was found on students’ reading or math Partnership Assessment of Readiness for College and Career (PARCC) scores.

Girlstart Program Impact Statement: 2015-16

Year Published: 2016

This non-experimental evaluation focused on pre- and post-program survey results distributed to girls enrolled in Girlstart After School and Summer Camp programs throughout Texas. The study evaluated whether program participants showed an increase in confidence, ability, and desire to pursue and accomplish STEM related opportunities and future careers. The survey results for Girlstart’s After School program met or exceeded all goals set by the program prior to the post-program survey, showing a majority of girls interested in STEM, pursuing STEM careers, and feeling more confident in their abilities to complete STEM related tasks. Summer Camp evaluation results showed a similar pattern, however, results were not compared to pre-survey goals. 

Arkansas 21st Century Community Learning Centers Statewide Evaluation, 2014-2015 Annual Report

Year Published: 2016

A statewide evaluation of 21st CCLC programs in Arkansas examining student achievement and social emotional skills and parents’ satisfaction with the program.  The evaluation used student, parent, and staff surveys, as well as annual performance reports and found that programs provided an environment where students felt that they were supported academically and were able to develop positive social and emotional skills and good work habits. Similarly, parent satisfaction with Arkansas’ 21st CCLC programs was high. Parents felt as though their children were safe when they were at the program and felt that their child’s participation in the program encouraged better communication with the schools. Program staff felt as though they related content of the program to school-day academics and that they had effective communication between supervising staff directing student youth workers. Overall, staff at Arkansas 21st CCLC programs came to the program with sufficient training, were trained sufficiently upon start at programs, and stayed at the program for a reasonable time.
 

The Impact of Afterschool STEM: Techbridge After-School

Year Published: 2016

Techbridge offers afterschool and summer programs with hands-on projects and career exploration to inspire girls in STEM. In this selection of evaluation data from the 2012-2013 school year, participants demonstrated gains along three major categories of youth outcomes—interest in STEM, capacity to engage in STEM, and finding value in STEM.

The Impact of Afterschool STEM: EVOLUTIONS After School Program

Year Published: 2016

EVOLUTIONS (Evoking Learning and Understanding Through Investigations of the Natural Sciences) is a multi-year afterschool program for high school students at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. In this selection of evaluation data from the 2014-2015 school year, participants demonstrated gains along three major categories of youth outcomes—interest in STEM, capacity to engage in STEM, and finding value in STEM.

The Impact of Afterschool STEM: Project GUTS

Year Published: 2016

Project GUTS (Growing Up Thinking Scientifically) is an afterschool program in which middle school students design, create and test computer models to simulate “what if” scenarios for real-world questions of community and societal concern. In this selection of evaluation data from the 2010-2011 school year, participants demonstrated gains along three major categories of youth outcomes—interest in STEM, capacity to engage in STEM, and finding value in STEM.

The Impact of Afterschool STEM: Science Action Club

Year Published: 2016

Science Action Club is an afterschool program for middle school youth at the California Academy of Sciences where students explore the local environment and document their discoveries to better understand and protect our planet. In this selection of evaluation data from the 2014-2015 school year, participants demonstrated gains along three major categories of youth outcomes—interest in STEM, capacity to engage in STEM, and finding value in STEM.

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