A project of the Afterschool Alliance.
Card image cap
Clear

Note: Multi-select with Ctrl/Cmd

Clear

Page 1 of 2

Michigan 21st Century Community Learning Centers Evaluation: 2016-2017 Annual Report

Year Published: 2018

A statewide evaluation of Michigan’s 21st Century Community Learning Center (21st CCLC) programs found that based on grades and surveys of teachers, students, and parents, students attending a program for at least 30 days (regular attendees) saw academic gains, as well as improvements in their behavior and engagement in school. Approximately half of students with room for improvement (defined as having a fall GPA below 3.0), saw grade improvement in math (51 percent) and English/language arts (49 percent) from fall to spring. Teacher surveys also reflected an improvement in classroom performance for behaviors such as turning in homework on time and participating in class (73 percent), as well as getting along with other students (75 percent). In addition, both students and parents reported overall positive perceptions of program impact on academic learning and behavior.

Michigan 21st Century Community Learning Centers Evaluation: 2015-2016 Annual Report

Year Published: 2017

A statewide evaluation of Michigan’s 21st Century Community Learning Center (21st CCLC) programs found that based on grades and surveys of teachers, students, and parents, students attending a program for at least 30 days (regular attendees) saw academic gains, as well as improvements in their behavior and engagement in school. Approximately half of students with room for improvement (defined as having a fall GPA below 3.0), saw grade improvement in math (52 percent) and English/language arts (48 percent) from fall to spring. Teacher surveys also reflected an improvement in classroom performance for behaviors such as turning in homework on time and participating in class (73 percent), as well as getting along with other students (74 percent). In addition, both students and parents reported overall positive perceptions of program impact on academic learning and behavior.  

Michigan 21st Century Community Learning Centers Evaluation: 2014-2015 Annual Report

Year Published: 2016

A statewide evaluation of Michigan’s 21st Century Community Learning Center (21st CCLC) programs during the 2014-15 program year found that based on grades and surveys of teachers, students, and parents, students attending a program for at least 30 days (regular attendees) saw academic gains, as well as improvements in their behavior and engagement in school. Approximately half of students with room for improvement (defined as having a fall GPA below 3.0), saw grade improvement in math (49 percent) and English/language arts (50 percent) from fall to spring. Teacher surveys also reflected an improvement in classroom performance for behaviors such as turning in homework on time and participating in class (73 percent), as well as getting along with other students (75 percent). In addition, both students and parents reported overall positive perceptions of program impact on academic learning and behavior.  

Oakland School-Based After School Programs Evaluation: 2014-15 Findings Report

Year Published: 2015

An evaluation of 82 afterschool programs funded by the Oakland School-Based After School Partnership, a collaboration between Oakland Fund for Children and Youth (OFCY) and the Oakland Unified School District’s After School Programs Office (ASPO), that served 16,505 students during the 2014-2015 school year. Site visits and student surveys were used to evaluate the quality of the program and student’s perceptions of the program’s impacts on their academic performance, behavior, health, and readiness for the future. The evaluation found that Oakland afterschool programs are positively impacting their students’ academics, behavior, self-confidence, health and wellness, and readiness for the future.

Effects of the FITKids randomized controlled trial on executive control and brain function

Year Published: 2014

A randomized control study of 221 children participating in the Fitness Improves Thinking in Kids (FITKids) program, a nine-month afterschool physical activity program. Students participating in FITKids in their afterschool program increased their physical fitness by 6 percent compared to less than 1 percent improvement by students not participating in the program. Students in the afterschool program also improved their ability to pay attention, avoid distraction, and switch between cognitive tasks.

Independent Statewide Evaluation of ASES and 21st CCLC After School Programs

Year Published: 2012

This statewide longitudinal evaluation examined the After School Education and Safety (ASES) and 21st Century Community Learning Center (21st CCLC) programs, which are designed to unite schools, community-based organizations, cities, and businesses to provide elementary and middle school students academic support in a safe environment. Results from this evaluation, collected using standardized test scores, student surveys, teacher surveys, and administrative data, suggest that students who frequently participated in these afterschool programs made greater academic and physical fitness gains than their non-participating peers. For the purposes of this evaluation, frequent participation was defined as attending the program at least three days per week for elementary students and attending at least two days per week for middle school students.

Independent Statewide Evaluations of High School After School Programs

Year Published: 2012

This statewide longitudinal evaluation examined the After School Safety and Enrichment for Teens (ASSETs) program, California’s high school component of the state’s 21st Century Community Learning Center (21st CCLC) program. The ASSETs program provides academically enriching activities for high school students after school and helps students pass the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE). Results from this evaluation, based on standardized test scores, student surveys, teacher surveys and administrative data, suggest that students participating in the program improved their academic performance, attendance, behavior and physical fitness.

21st Century Community Learning Centers Administered by Coordinated Child Care of Pinellas, Inc.: Summative Evaluation Report of the School-Based Program, Year 2

Year Published: 2011

A report on the performance data for the 21st Community Learning Centers (21st CCLC) program operated by Coordinated Child Care of Pinellas, Inc. under two grants from the Florida Department of Education. Program participants at all three middle schools sites were more likely to meet or exceed grade-level standards on the math, English language arts, and science Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) than students in the middle schools overall. Additionally, the report looked at the program’s impact on health and physical fitness, finding that an overwhelming majority of students participating in the program maintained a healthy Body Mass Index (BMI) or showed improvement in their BMI scores throughout the academic year, as well as were able to successfully identify the healthier foods.

Advancing Achievement: Findings from an Independent Evaluation of a Major After-School Initiative

Year Published: 2008

This Public/Private Ventures evaluation studied the Communities Organizing Resources to Advance Learning (CORAL) project, an eight-year, $58 million afterschool initiative in cities across California designed by the James Irvine Foundation aimed at providing academic enrichment and support to primarily elementary school students in the lowest performing schools, who are often living in low-income families. The evaluation found that students participating in the CORAL program, a majority of whom were English language learners and reading below grade level, saw literacy-related gains. CORAL participants who were English language learners and those who were furthest behind in reading experienced greater gains in their reading performance while in the program compared to their peers who entered the program reading at grade level or who were English proficient. Children who began the CORAL program two or more grade levels behind in reading, based on the individualized reading assessments, gained just as much as their higher-achieving counterparts over the same period of time. The study also found that CORAL students reported having a positive experience in the program. Close to 90 percent of CORAL students reported that they felt safe in the program, and 71 percent agreed that they felt that they belonged in the program. Parents of students in the program also reported a positive experience for their children, with more than 90 percent of parents reporting that the program helped their child to do better in school.

Afterschool Program Participation and the Development of Child Obesity and Peer Acceptance

Year Published: 2005

This longitudinal study examined the role that afterschool program participation plays in the development of childhood obesity and peer acceptance among low-income and minority children. The study assessed three unnamed northeastern, urban, public schools and found that the prevalence of obesity was significantly lower for afterschool participants compared to nonparticipants (21 percent vs. 33 percent) controlling for baseline obesity, poverty status, and race and ethnicity. The study also found that students participating in the afterschool programs showed significant increases in peer acceptance during their time in the program.

Previous Next